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 Previous Cases

 

Long v. Live Nation Worldwide

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleges noncompliant accessible seating ticket sales on the NFL Ticket Exchange.

 

Killam et al v. City of Seattle 

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleges noncompliant accessible seating and accessible routes at McCaw Hall in Seattle, WA as well as discriminatory ticket sale and seating policies and practices.

 

Long et al v. Imperial Parking, et al

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit resulted in a settlement agreement to address accessible parking allegations in parking facilities across Western Washington.

 

Struiksma v. Zones, Inc

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleges unlawful termination of employment of a blind individual. The parties reached a confidential settlement agreements.

 

Brown et al v. Seattle Theatre Group 

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged noncompliant accessible routes, concessions, restrooms, drinking fountains, and seating at the Moore and Paramount Theatres in Seattle, WA as well as noncompliant ticketing policies and practices. Defendant accepted the judgment.

 

Brown v. Diamond Parking Services

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged accessible parking violations at the Diamond owned parking lot at 2021 Fifth Avenue in Seattle. The parties reached a confidential settlement agreement.

 

Reynoldson v. Chateau Ste Michelle Wine Estates Ltd 

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged discriminatory amphitheater accessible seating and ticketing policies and practices as well as accessible route and accessible parking violations at the Chateau Ste. Michelle Amphitheater and Winery. The parties reached a confidential settlement agreement.

 

Reynoldson v. University of Washington

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged discriminatory ticketing policies, accessible parking, ramp, and seating violations at the University of Washington’s Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion. The parties reached a settlement agreement that addresses these allegations.

 

Reynoldson v. City of Seattle 

In collaboration with Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center (CREEC), Conrad Reynoldson advocated as a named plaintiff in a class-action suit requiring the City of Seattle to install or remediate over 20,000 curb ramps throughout Seattle over the next 18 years. The Court granted final approval of the settlement on November 1, 2017.

 

Leal v. Everett Public School

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit successfully challenged the Constitutionality of an Everett Public School System policy barring the distribution of materials not originally authored by students.

 

Daman Lee Michael Wandke v. Yellow Cab Inc

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged discriminatory accessible taxi fares up to eleven times the regular fare and minimums up to $75. The parties reached a settlement agreement that addresses these allegations and provides for additional staff training.

 

Twede v. UW

A lawsuit in United States District Court in the Western District of Washington. This suit alleged multiple occurrences of inaccessible parking structures at the University of Washington, Seattle Campus. The parties reached a settlement agreement that addresses these accessibility concerns and provides modifications of the parking areas causing barriers.  

 

 

Current Cases

WACDA litigates various types of cases with the overall goal of protecting persons with disabilities and ensuring accessibility for all. WACDA is most experienced in representing individuals who are unable to access buildings, those who are discriminated against by public housing or by employers, and those who have service pets.

 

Building and Venue Accessibility

Under the ADA, places of public accommodation are prohibited from providing separate or unequal benefits and services to individuals with disabilities. Many of WACDA’s clients are barred from visiting restaurants, venues, and stores due to inaccessible parking lots, a lack of ramps for wheelchair users to enter, or a variety of other discriminatory architectural barriers.

Currently, WACDA is litigating Landis v. T-Mobile Park, a lawsuit that is currently on appeal before the Ninth Court. WACDA represents four Washington residents who use wheelchairs and have attended games at T-Mobile Park, each of whom have encountered issues with seating, food service, or access to certain parts of the stadium. Plaintiffs filed suit against the Washington State Major League Baseball Stadium Public Facilities District alleging that the conditions of T-Mobile stadium violated state and federal laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act.

 

WACDA also brought a case, Lewis v. Phan-Dong Thap Noodle, after Defendants extensively renovated their building and failed to make a single one of the five entrances accessible to people using wheelchairs. Plaintiff is unable to patronize Dong Thap Noodles, a restaurant located on Defendants’ property, because the only public entrance into the restaurant requires ascending a small set of steps, making it impossible for him or anyone else with similar mobility disabilities to enter the restaurant.

 

Public Housing Discrimination

Public entities, such as the Seattle Housing Authority (“SHA”), are required to make reasonable modifications in its policies and practices to avoid discrimination on the basis of disability.

SHA illegally and intentionally discriminated against Plaintiff on the basis of his disability and in violation of the ADA, by denying him the benefits of public housing that meets his basic needs. As a result, WACDA filed Roque v. Seattle Housing Authority, which alleged discrimination as a result of SHA’s refusal to allow Plaintiff’s primary care provider and visiting nurses to park at his apartment complex, therefore denying him a reasonable disability accommodation.

 

Failure to Accommodate

WACDA also represents several clients who were discriminated against by their employer for failing to make a reasonable accommodation. A reasonable accommodation is an alteration to the job or work environment that allows a person with a disability, who is qualified for the job, to perform the essential functions of that job. In Hadley v. Foster Farms, Plaintiff brought suit in order to recover for the Defendant’s acts of disability discrimination, failure to accommodate, and retaliation. Plaintiff requested a reasonable accommodation at work due to her medical condition. Her employer never attempted to determine a reasonable accommodation, but instead retaliated against her. The plaintiff in Van Woert v. UWKC and Washington Service Corps alleged failure to accommodate and disability discrimination, when Plaintiff, who is deaf, was not provided with an interpreter during work.

 

Service Animals

Service animals are individually trained to perform tasks or work for people with disabilities. They can provide important support to individuals, and WACDA seeks to ensure that individuals with service animals do not face discrimination or accessibility issues. For example, Westrick v. Select Rentals was filed in Grant County Superior Court. Plaintiff, who requires the assistance of a service dog, was discriminated against by Defendant when it refused to allow her to bring her service dog with her to its vacation rental. Plaintiff brought suit alleging violation of the Washington Law Against Discrimination, and conversion.

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This website was last updated July 2020

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